DEHYDRATED FRUIT & FRUIT LEATHERS

CANDIED TANGELO PEEL
   
DEHYDRATED APPLES

DEHYDRATED APRICOTS
 
DEHYDRATED BANANA
 
DEHYDRATED BLACKBERRIES
     
DEHYDRATED BLACKCURRANTS

DEHYDRATED CHERRIES 

PEACHES, DEHYDRATED

PERSIMMONS, DEHYDRATED

PLUMS, DEHYDRATED

STRAWBERRIES, DEHYDRATED

TOMATOES, DEHYDRATED
    
FRUIT LEATHERS  (ROLL-UPS)

Ready to eat and delicious in school snack boxes, homemade fruit leathers are easily made. Peel and cook fresh fruit before blending into a puree, adding some applesauce or pear puree if the mixture is too runny and a little water or juice if the mixture is too thick. Dehydrate fruit leathers continuously to ensure even drying all over. When dry, fruit leathers should be pliable with no soft spots, easy to roll up into logs when still warm from the dehydrator, with a layer of baking paper in between if preferred (making it easy to unroll for snacking by little people). Fruit leathers are an excellent recipe to use up leftover fruit pulp from juicing/jelly-making! Approximately 2 cups of fruit is required for each fruit leather tray. Add 2 teaspoons of lemon juice or 1/8 teaspoon ascorbic acid for each 2 cups of light-coloured fruit to prevent darkening (oxidation).

    
   
  
  
    
   
WATERMELON FRUIT LEATHER

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Acknowledgement 
Kaya Wanjoo. Food Preserving kaditj kalyakoorl moondang-ak kaaradj midi boodjar-ak nyininy, yakka wer waabiny, Noongar moort. Ngala kaditj baalap kalyakoorl nidja boodjar wer kep kaaradjiny, baalap moorditj nidja yaakiny-ak wer moorditj moort wer kaditj Birdiya wer yeyi.
Hello and Welcome. Food Preserving acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we live, work and play, the Nyoongar people. We recognise their connection to the land and local waterways, their resilience and commitment to community and pay our respect to Elders past and present.