APPLESAUCE FRUIT LEATHER

These fruit roll ups are pretty, tasty and have just the right amount of sweetness! This is a great recipe for adding to the lunch box for kids, and so quick to prepare! 


 

Ingredients for  APPLESAUCE FRUIT LEATHER

YIELD: 1 Tray (multiply for bigger batches)

Applesauce (fresh or bottled)

1 1/2 cups

Ground Cinnamon (optional)

1 teaspoon

 
METHOD: 
1.  Line a fruit leather insert (for a dehydrator tray, round inserts are pictured right) with non-stick baking paper - cut to size/shape as required so it fits inside the tray.
2.  Place lined fruit leather insert onto your dehydrator tray. Spread applesauce evenly onto the lined fruit leather insert.
3.  Sprinkle the top of the mixture with ground cinnamon, if desired (we like to add lots).
4.  Dehydrate for 5-7 hours at 55°C (130°F) or until dry. Surface may be slightly sticky (but it must be dry).
NOTE: If you're making several trays of fruit leather, or a combination of dried fruit slices and fruit leather, this will extend the dehydration period. Always continue dehydrating until the desired texture is achieved and rotate trays as required.
5.  Remove fruit leather from the fruit leather insert, leaving the paper backing attached if you prefer (our children prefer it left on). Roll up the fruit leather to form a log and cut into 6-8 pieces with clean kitchen scissors (or a sharp knife) OR wrap the whole log in baking paper, twist the ends closed and freeze for longer storage.
6.  Fruit leather can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks or frozen for up to 3 months.
 
FLAVOUR IDEAS:
Change the ground cinnamon to:

o  Brown Sugar;

o  Brown Sugar + Cinnamon;

o  Cinnamon + Nutmeg;

o  Cloves;

o  Ginger;

o  Ginger + Lemon;

o  Honey;

o  Honey + Ginger;

o  Honey + Lemon Thyme;

o  Lemon Juice;

o  Lemon Thyme;

o  Lemon Zest;

o  Maple Syrup;

o  Nutmeg;

o  Vanilla.

Replace part of the apple puree with a different fruit puree. Try using:

o  Apricots;

o  Berries (de-seed or leave seeds in the berry puree);

o  Figs;

o  Mango;

o  Peaches.

 
Author: Megan Radaich          
Image credit: Megan Radaich          
Publication: www.foodpreserving.org

Share on: