Making Jam: Low-Sugar Pectin Jam

Low-Sugar Mixed Berry Jam
Jam is made from a combination of fruit, sugar, pectin and acid. The sugar in jam not only helps to preserve the fruit, but also helps form the jam consistency and adds flavour. If you wish to reduce the sugar content from your jams, and/or replace part of the sugar with honey (or another sugar alternative) you must use a no/low-sugar pectin to achieve a jam consistency. Do not use a traditional (full sugar) pectin and remove the sugar from a traditional jam recipe: you will end up with syrup! Follow the low/no-sugar pectin box instructions and do not adjust their recipe to ensure you end up with a jam consistency (and to prevent spoilage).
  
Low-Sugar Jam: Pros
Lower sugar content, fruitier flavour, perfect set every time, and can sweeten by adding mild flavoured honey, maple syrup, agave nectar, Stevia or Splenda.
   
Low-Sugar Jam: Cons
Low-sugar jam has a different colour, flavour and consistency than traditional jams, and it also has a much lower yield.
  
We've tried many batches of no-sugar jam over the past few years, but have found a reduced-sugar jam is the best, using around 30% sugar (depending on the fruit).

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Kaya Wanjoo. Food Preserving kaditj kalyakoorl moondang-ak kaaradj midi boodjar-ak nyininy, yakka wer waabiny, Noongar moort. Ngala kaditj baalap kalyakoorl nidja boodjar wer kep kaaradjiny, baalap moorditj nidja yaakiny-ak wer moorditj moort wer kaditj Birdiya wer yeyi.
Hello and Welcome. Food Preserving acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we live, work and play, the Nyoongar people. We recognise their connection to the land and local waterways, their resilience and commitment to community and pay our respect to Elders past and present.